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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> this is "world news," and right now, millions of us are slipping and sliding across highways layered with treacherous ice. watch this bus go into a light post. cars trapped on highways or out of control and we report from the middle of the storm. >>> showdown, live from iran on the eve of nuclear talks, why some americans are being cheered by the iranians tonight and david muir is there. >>> real money. on oscar weekend we show you a new way to save a lot of cash on movie tickets and popcorn. >>> and our person of the week. >> thelma & louise ride again. >> i sit down with my friend robin roberts who tells all of us how to find the strength inside you don't even know you have. >> i feel strength like i have never felt before. >> good evening. as we come on the air this friday night, millions of people are trying to drive home on sheets of ice. the giant snowstorm still on the move. think of these images as a kind of sos, planes paralyzed, highways a danger zone. as one monster storm is winding down, another is powering up. abc's john schriffen is in minneapolis where streets
this morning skidded off the runway as it landed. and in kansas yesterday crews used plows and shovels to dig one plane out. and back here in minnesota, this is what they have to dig out of. and the roads, covered with layers of snow and ice. now, diane, there's another storm on the way set to hit the northeast this weekend. people in new england, bracing for similar conditions. >> all right, john, our thanks to you, and safe travel to everyone tonight. >>> and now the big news on oscar pistorius, the olympic star charged in the murder of his girlfriend. it's surprised a lot of people that he's free on bail tonight. why? and did his medical condition play a role? abc's bazi kanani tells us. >> reporter: oscar pistorius appeared tense and somber as he waited to learn whether he could go home. >> i've come to the conclusion that the accused has made a case to be released on bail. >> reporter: cries of relief from his family. >> we know oscar's version that is the truth and that will prevail in the coming court case. >> reporter: defense attorneys convinced the court pistorius is not a flight ri
on the story for us. >> reporter: stoic, oscar pistorius back in court today, as prosecutors argued he was too much a flight risk to grant bail, showing blueprints and explaining what happened the night he shot his girlfriend, model reeva steenkamp. pistorius had said they were both sleeping when he woke, heard a noise, grabbed his gun from under the bed and rushed into the bathroom. but prosecutors say pistorius would have had to cross the bed to get to the bathroom and should have noticed steenkamp was not in it. and they say this is key -- they intend to use ballistics to show he was already wearing his prosthetic legs when firing his gun -- hoping to disprove his testimony that he woke in the middle of the night and rushed to confront an intruder without taking the time to put on his prosthetics. >> here, the prosecution has a very critical piece of evidence that could determine whether his story was accurate or not. >> reporter: but in a series of missteps, prosecutors revealed the witness who claimed to hear yelling was up to six football fields away, and backtracked from claims they fou
. this woman was walking with her two children when the blast hit. doctors told us she will likely lose both her legs. were you walking when the bomb went off? we saw a little boy recovering from surgery after debris tore through his body. his father, who was walking with him when the bomb went off, in tears, overcome with fear for his son's life. twice in the past year, rebels have tried to take damascus by storm and failed. now, it seems they will try to take it by terror, slowly choking the life out of one of the world's great cities to try to bring down the regime. diane? >> thank you, terry moran, reporting in tonight from a turbulent damascus. >>> and from damascus, we head now to iran. and a new, defiant challenge from that country, a country filled with nuclear ambition. and once again, abc's david muir is reporting live from tehran tonight. david? >> reporter: diane, good evening again from iran this evening. and we begin with that new u.n. report, the inspectors who say they discovered advanced centrifuges installed at one of iran's main nuclear facilities. they say it's proof that
his own legacy? >> well, this is the tremendous question that lies before us. i mean, there is no job description for a retired pope. >> reporter: so, benedict remains pope until the end of the month. the cardinals have to assemble here for a conclave to elect his successor within 20 days. that takes us to mid-march. which means that a billion catholics around the world should have a new pope by easter. diane? >> all right, jeffrey, thank you. and, of course, that new pope will have to face the call for change, from many people in the american catholic church. there are 77.7 million catholics here in the united states. nearly 1 in 4 of us is catholic. and rhode island, new jersey and massachusetts still have the highest concentration of catholics. but in sheer numbers, the biggest growth is among hispanics. and abc's cecilia vega spent the day gathering american reaction from all over. cecilia? >> reporter: diane, good evening. we're here at st. mary's cathedral in san francisco and as you said, we've been speaking with catholics all day long. and i will tell you, boy, the surprise do
telling us he very well may have been hiding in plain sight. from a barrage of gun fire to a rush of flame -- to that shell of a house now nothing left but rubble. >> shut down the freeway, possibly for the subject we've been looking for. >> reporter: christopher dorner's run from the law began to unravel here. to a cabin near a ski resort. police say dorner broke in and yesterday, when two unsuspecting women came by to clean, he allegedly tied them up, took their car and then sped off. one of the women broke free and managed to call the police. dorner was once again on the run. chased by police, he abandoned the stolen car, then up the road, police say dorner carjacked rick heltebrake. >> dorner jumped out of the snow at me, gun drawn, big, long rifle. so, i just stopped and put my truck in park and put my hands up. he pointed his gun at me and said, "i don't want to hurt you, just get out and start walking up the road and take your dog." >> reporter: dorner raced off again. this time, a fish and game warden spotted him and that officer engaged in a life or death shootout. >> dorner reali
for the united states. today, a u.n. panel declared it's time to bring charges, using those two powerful words, war crimes. and they say the crimes were committed not just by the government of president assad, but by his mysterious opposition, as well. so, as the battle rages closer to the capital of damascus, our terry moran has made the dangerous journey into the heart of the simmering conflict. he is in damascus itself. >> reporter: the road from beirut to damascus. we drove into syria along this heavily guarded route -- checkpoint after checkpoint after checkpoint. it is now a lifeline, as damascus, the stronghold of the government of president bashar assad, becomes a city under siege. it is a dirty war, in a crucial country. just look at the map. the kay use engulfing syria threatens to spill over into iraq on one side, israel and lebanon on the other. a nightmare scenario for the u.s. the united nations now estimates that 70,000 people have been killed in the fighting, though, no one really knows. a u.n. commission today called for war crimes investigations of both sides. assad's governm
. >>> and finally, the underdogs on top. after that fancy little dog wins the best at westminster, you spur us to give the "world news" awards for what our dogs really do. >>> good evening. it was a day of reckoning. the end of ten days of terror. and police believe a killer once on the loose is now dead. these images tell the story. the charred foundation, all that's left of a cabin in the woods, set ablaze. about police believe that christopher dorner was inside. while in another part of southern california, police gather to lay one of his victims to rest, one of their own. his widow, in a moving embrace by his casket, covered with a flag. we begin tonight's coverage with abc's cecilia vega now. cecilia? >> reporter: diane, good evening. i'm standing at the one-time police command post, the heart of that manhunt for christopher dorner. right over my shoulder, those houses right there, we now know that's where dorner was holed up just as of yesterday. neighbors telling us he very well may have been hiding in plain sight. from a barrage of gun fire to a rush of flame -- [ gun fire ] to that sh
. a nightmare scenario for the u.s. the united nations now estimates that 70,000 people have been killed in the fighting, though no one really knows. a u.n. commission today called for war crimes investigations of both sides. assad's government, which has sought to crush the rebellion by any means necessary. and the rebels, many of whom are increasingly seen by ordinary syrians as war lords, gangsters and religious fanatics who regularly post videos of beheadings and other atrocities on youtube. damascus is quiet tonight. some light traffic. no one really walking around. 5 million people hunkered down, as the terrible war that is tearing their country apart has now arrived here, in fierce battles raging in the city's suburbs. syria's many minorities live in terror of a jihadist takeover of their country. before we came here, we visited christian refugees from syria who had fled to beirut. they said they were forced out of their villages by muslim fundamentalists -- ethnically cleansed. they supported the rebellion at first, but not now. they've lost their homes, their communities, their
takes us to a stretch of american highway that felt it the most. >> reporter: tangled and twisted on a detroit highway. this was the scene along a mile and a half stretch of i-75 today. at least 30 vehicles were involved in the crash. three people were killed, including two children believed to be siblings. the culprit? whiteout conditions from a single band of snow. wxyz meteorologist hallie vogel takes us through it. >> only 15 minutes. that's all it takes. >> reporter: this is what it looked like inside that blinding whiteout. it's called lake effect snow. and it was created as cold air and wind passed over the warmer waters of lake michigan. lake effect snow squalls are notorious. you can be driving along with perfect visibility, then, in seconds, you can't see anything at all. fierce winds whipped up snow along indiana highways today, too. 40 cars piled up on i-70. this is part of that same system that has created weather bedlam around the nation the past few days, including that tornado, believed to have had winds of 160 miles per hour in adairsville, georgia. abc's steve os
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)